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The water-related aircraft operators' checklist is a helpful resource for operators to comply with the federal and provincial Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) regulations.

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) threaten Manitoba's waters. Species such as zebra mussels can cause major negative economic, environmental and social impacts to water-users such as fishers, recreational water-users, industry and tourism.

In Manitoba:

  • you must be free of aquatic invasive species.
  • REGULATION UPDATE (as of May 2023): antifouling paint must be applied to the floats/pontoons if using AIS Control Zones established to control the spread of zebra mussels. The paint must be maintained in good condition.
  • this regulation change ensures consistency with other conveyances, such as watercraft.,. This change also enhances enforceability of the law
  • you must report suspected AIS sightings to the Manitoba government. This does not include water bodies with known AIS detections. You can report by clicking here

 

Planning your trip - know before you go!

Aquatic invasive species requirements differ between AIS invaded, zebra mussel invaded and presumably non-invaded water bodies. As such, it is critical to determine your origin water body and destination water bodies before you travel.

 

WHEN LANDING ON A WATER BODY, you need to...

  • ensure the water-related equipment that was last used in another water body or control zone than the one you are entering is dried completely (or decontaminated).
    To do this, for example:
  • pre-determine if landing or operating on an AIS Control Zone. If so, there are two options to consider:
    • If operating in the:
      • Betula Lake /White Lake /Jessica Lake Control Zone;
      • Shoal Lake Control Zone (located in south-eastern Manitoba);
      • Lake of the Woods (Buffalo Bay) Control Zone; or
      • Winnipeg River Control Zone

      in addition to the taking off and landing steps, you must...
      • decontaminate AND dry completely water-related equipment before placing it into another water body or different control zone.
        Note: decontamination of water-related equipment is not required:
        • if taking off then landing on the same water body or control zone.
        • OR
        • when the water-related equipment is dedicated for use in a specific water body.
    • If operating in the:
      • Lake Manitoba /Fairford River / Lake St. Martin Control Zone;
      • Red River / Lake Winnipeg /Nelson River Control Zone; or
      • Saskatchewan River/ Cedar Lake Control Zone

      in addition to the taking off and landing steps, you must...
      • have applied, anti-fouling paint to underwater surfaces such as the aircraft's floats/pontoons if using an AIS Control Zone established for controlling the spread of zebra mussels. The anti-fouling paint must be maintained in good condition.

        Anti-fouling paint is paint treated with biocides or other products intended to prevent the attachment or slow the growth of organisms. Note: Anti-fouling paint must state on the label that the paint is to prevent attachment of zebra mussels. Also, antifouling paint must be approved by Health Canada to be used legally in Canada.

        Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency regulates the use of anti-fouling paint for use in Canada. For more information, visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/corporate/about-health-canada/branches-agencies/pest-management-regulatory-agency.html


      • decontaminate AND dry completely water-related equipment before placing it into another water body or different control zone.
        Note: decontamination of water-related equipment is not required if:
        • taking off then landing on the same water body or control zone.
        • OR
        • water-related equipment is dedicated for use in a specific water body.

BEFORE TAKING OFF FROM A WATER BODY, you need to...

  • inspect the aircraft and water-related equipment. Ensure they are free of:
    • AIS,
    • aquatic plants (e.g., weeds and noticeable build up of algae) and
    • mud.
    Pay close attention to areas that are close to or below the water line (e.g., retractable rudder, cables) and water-related equipment that may get wet (e.g., anchor, ropes) or hold water (e.g., hand pump).

    Float plane operators are advised to lay face-down on the pontoon and run their hands along the pontoon at and below the waterline to examine the entire pontoon underwater surface thoroughly. Unless treated with anti-fouling paint, the pontoon surface should be relatively smooth. If the pontoons or water-related equipment feel like sandpaper, this could be tiny, attached zebra mussels.
  • Where required:
    • floats/pontoons and other underwater surfaces can be decontaminated following the Approved Decontamination Methods for Watercraft (Schedule B) of the Manitoba government's Aquatic Invasive Species Regulation.
    • water-related equipment can be decontaminated following the Approved Decontamination Methods for Water-related Equipment (Schedule C) of the Manitoba government's Aquatic Invasive Species Regulation.
  • drain all water from water-related equipment.
    Note: water drained from the floats/pontoons of the aircraft must be collected in a container and disposed of on land so that it does not drain into any water body.
  • dry completely (or decontaminate) water-related equipment before placing it into another water body or control zone.

    To decontaminate water-related equipment, follow the Approved Decontamination Methods for Water-related Equipment (Schedule C) of the Manitoba government's Aquatic Invasive Species Regulation.

    Note: if taking off then landing on the same water body or control zone, drying completely or decontaminating water-related equipment is not required.

 

PROTECT MANITOBA’S WATER BODIES FROM AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES (AIS).† BE PART OF THE SOLUTION AND DO YOUR PART - EVERY TIME!